susiron:

The worst thing about Tumblr mobile though is you’ll open it up and see something really interesting at the top of your dash

then the app refreshes itself and it’s gone forever.

Sometimes this really seems to shock people. They appear genuinely upset when I say ‘this conversation is over’ or ‘I’m actually not interested in debating this with you.’ There’s an expectation that if you care about social justice and political issues, you’re always ‘on.’ You’re always ready to debate, you’re always ready to have theoretical discussions about your own lived experiences and the issues you care about, you’re always ready to defend yourself. That’s manifestly ridiculous and unjust, an expectation that’s simply not reasonable.

Sometimes, I Just Don’t Have Time for Individual Fights | this ain’t livin’ (via brutereason)

Setting boundaries/self preservation <3

(via bitterglitterqueer)

blocktheplate:

Minor-league lawsuit claims MLB fails to pay minimum wage to minor-leaguers


Minor-league baseball players regularly work 60- to 70-hour weeks with only two or three days off a month, but they get no overtime pay. They receive only a $25 meal per diem — no salary — for the mandatory four to six weeks of spring training. Same goes for any instructional leagues they may be required to attend when their 140-game schedule ends.




Players are required to pay $5 per day in clubhouse dues for each home game


A handful of players receive six-figure signing bonuses in their first year, but many sign for $5,000 or less. So most players earn less than the federal U.S. poverty line, which in 2014 is an annual income of $11,670 for a single-person household.




How does a $9-billion industry like Major League Baseball get away with this?



Continue reading

blocktheplate:

Minor-league lawsuit claims MLB fails to pay minimum wage to minor-leaguers

Minor-league baseball players regularly work 60- to 70-hour weeks with only two or three days off a month, but they get no overtime pay. They receive only a $25 meal per diem — no salary — for the mandatory four to six weeks of spring training. Same goes for any instructional leagues they may be required to attend when their 140-game schedule ends.

Players are required to pay $5 per day in clubhouse dues for each home game

A handful of players receive six-figure signing bonuses in their first year, but many sign for $5,000 or less. So most players earn less than the federal U.S. poverty line, which in 2014 is an annual income of $11,670 for a single-person household.

How does a $9-billion industry like Major League Baseball get away with this?

Continue reading